【僕等がいた】

tumblrrmokong:

UNDYING LOVE.Larry Swilling is truly devoted to his wife, Jimmie Sue, they have been married for 57 years he is looking for a kidney to give his 76-year-old wife, the life-saving organ she needs.via CBS News:Larry Swilling and his wife Jimmie Sue have been happily married 57 years. So happily, in fact, that Larry has now come to realize the downside of loving someone so much you can’t live without them.You can’t live without them.Larry Swilling and his wife Jimmie Sue. Jimmie Sue needs a kidney donor and no one in the family is a suitable match, so Larry has taken to the streets to try to find one.“She’s my heart,” he said.

tumblrrmokong:

UNDYING LOVE.

Larry Swilling is truly devoted to his wife, Jimmie Sue, they have been married for 57 years he is looking for a kidney to give his 76-year-old wife, the life-saving organ she needs.

via CBS News:
Larry Swilling and his wife Jimmie Sue have been happily married 57 years. So happily, in fact, that Larry has now come to realize the downside of loving someone so much you can’t live without them.

You can’t live without them.

Larry Swilling and his wife Jimmie Sue. Jimmie Sue needs a kidney donor and no one in the family is a suitable match, so Larry has taken to the streets to try to find one.

“She’s my heart,” he said.

— 1 year ago with 244 notes
likeafieldmouse:

Richard Estes - The L Train (2009) - Oil on board

likeafieldmouse:

Richard Estes - The L Train (2009) - Oil on board

(via hifructosemag)

— 1 year ago with 8844 notes
"The idea that we might have moral obligations to the humans of the far future is a difficult one to process. After all, we humans are seasonal creatures, not stewards of deep time. The brevity of our lives colours our intuitions about value, and limits our moral vision. We can imagine futures for our children and grandchildren. We participate in their joys and weep for their hardships. We see that some glimmer of our fleeting lives survives on in them. But our distant descendants are opaque to us. We strain to see them, but they look alien across the abyss of time, transformed by the passage of so many millennia."
— 1 year ago with 42 notes
KIM VERSUS MANCINI: THE TRAGIC TITLE FIGHT THAT CHANGED BOXING FOREVER

Thirty years ago this month, South Korean boxer Kim Duk-Koo entered a Las Vegas ring for a world championship bout that would end with his death, trigger at least one suicide and change the sport forever.

For a generation of South Koreans, millions of whom watched live on television, the fight between Kim and world lightweight champion, Ray “Boom Boom” Mancini, remains a powerful memory.

Now a new book and accompanying documentary that coincide with the 30th anniversary hope to shed fresh light on the bout, its tragic aftermath and the impact it had on the lives and families of its two protagonists.

For Kim, then 23 and fighting for the first time in the United States, the glitz of Caesar’s Palace with its celebrity audience including the likes of Frank Sinatra, was a different universe from his impoverished upbringing in Korea.

“I remember when we landed in Las Vegas for the fight,” his trainer, Kim Yoon-Gu, now 56, recalled.

“The city was all lit up at night. It was like landing on a garden of flowers in the desert. We’d never seen anything like it,” he told AFP at the boxing gym he runs in Seoul.

US boxing commentators had pretty much written Kim Duk-Koo off before the November 13, 1982 clash with Mancini, a powerful 21-year-old from Youngstown, Ohio making his second defence of the world title.

But Kim was confident. Before leaving Seoul he had a carpenter rig up a mock coffin which he said he would use to bring back Mancini after the fight.

Unimpressed with such bravado, his trainer stomped it to pieces which he then hid under the ring in Kim’s training camp.

A brutal fight

The fight when it came was a particularly brutal one.

For 13 rounds, the two men went toe-to-toe in a slugging match that left both with badly swollen faces and struggling to see through bruised, puffed-up eyes.

At the end of the 13th, Kim Yoon-Gu tried to lift his fighter, telling him Mancini was exhausted and exhorting him to put in one last effort to finish him off.

“He clenched his teeth, nodded and said ‘Yes, I’ll do that’. And that was it. That was the last thing he ever said,” Kim said.

At the beginning of the 14th, Mancini connected with a straight right that snapped Kim’s head back and sent him crashing to the canvas.

The Korean managed to haul himself up by the ropes to beat the count, but referee Richard Green stepped in to stop the fight.

Kim Yoon-Gu had been tending to his corner and missed the actual knockout blow, but when he saw Kim on the ground, he knew at once that the fight was over.

“He was obviously hurt, but at that time we had no idea it was so serious,” he said.

Back in his corner, Kim collapsed and was taken from the ring on a stretcher to hospital where he was diagnosed with a blood clot on the brain and underwent emergency surgery.

He lapsed into a coma from which he never recovered and four days later he died.

On the flight back to South Korea, a traumatised Kim Yoon-Gu locked himself in the toilet and “cried and cried until we landed.

“I thought about quitting the sport entirely. In the end, I decided to stick with it, but it was a very, very difficult time,” he said at his gym where photos and posters of Kim Duk-Koo adorn the walls.

Suicide, depression and redemption

The consequences of the Kim-Mancini bout were far-reaching and tragic in their own right.

Four months after her son’s death, Kim’s distraught mother killed herself by drinking a bottle of pesticide.

Four months after that, referee Richard Green also took his own life, although there was no indication that his suicide was linked to the outcome of the fight for which he was never held in any way responsible.

Mancini, a devout Catholic, endured a prolonged period of depression and, although he fought again, was never the same boxer.

“In all the obvious ways, he was haunted,” American sportswriter Mark Kriegel, author of a new biography of Mancini titled “The Good Son,” told AFP in a telephone interview.

“He also got over it. The complications for Ray have more to do with the fact that the rest of the world didn’t get over it and continued using that fight as a kind of reference point for his life,” Kriegel said.

Kriegel’s book, and an accompanying documentary of the same name, climax with an emotional reunion in June last year between Mancini and Kim’s family.

Kim’s fiancee, Lee Young-Mee, had been pregnant at the time of the 1982 title fight and seven months later gave birth to a son, Kim Jiwan, now 29.

While being interviewed by Kriegel for the book, Jiwan had suggested a trip to the United States to meet with Mancini.

“As full of duty and obligation as Ray was, he wasn’t going to turn down a request from the son of the man who, without intention, died at his hands,” Kriegel said.

At the meeting in Mancini’s home, Jiwan admitted to the “hatred” he once felt for the boxer, before absolving him of any blame.

“I think it was not your fault,” he said.

The Kim-Mancini bout proved to be a watershed in boxing, triggering a series of major changes to the sport.

Championship bouts were reduced from 15 to 12 rounds, the standing eight-count was introduced and the medical tests required of boxers before a fight were overhauled.

— 1 year ago
2headedsnake:

Klea Mckenna, Album/Anthem is a series of large chromogenic photographs (30x40 inches) and an collection of small artifacts that were burned in a house fire. In April of 2009 a family home in rural Vermont burned to the ground. 15 months later I walked through the charred foundation and found a family photo album and a box of family snapshots that had melted into a dark mass. Locals told me that that after the fire the family had moved away and that what was left there had lain exposed to the snow, rain and heat of several seasons. The object I found was a palimpsest, a book of otherworldly patterns and colors. Nearly all recognizable imagery (the very purpose of snapshots and photo albums) had dissolved, leaving an intricate visual record of the elements, chaos and loss.

2headedsnake:

Klea Mckenna, Album/Anthem is a series of large chromogenic photographs (30x40 inches) and an collection of small artifacts that were burned in a house fire.

In April of 2009 a family home in rural Vermont burned to the ground. 15 months later I walked through the charred foundation and found a family photo album and a box of family snapshots that had melted into a dark mass. Locals told me that that after the fire the family had moved away and that what was left there had lain exposed to the snow, rain and heat of several seasons. The object I found was a palimpsest, a book of otherworldly patterns and colors. Nearly all recognizable imagery (the very purpose of snapshots and photo albums) had dissolved, leaving an intricate visual record of the elements, chaos and loss.

— 1 year ago with 188 notes

Thinking is suffering, because it is hard to find new and different ways of thinking and to produce new things when thought is already inscribed and contained within culture.

That which is unthought is uncomfortable because we are comfortable with the already thought. Thinking is the accepting of the discomfort that the unthought brings and trying to think the new in the forlorn hope that things will get better.

That’s the hope sustaining all writing (and painting and other creative acts): that at the end, things will be better.

Charlie Gere, ‘Art, Time and Technology’ (2006)

— 1 year ago

ssdmmfr:

Artist:

Andrei Molodkin

“Oil Evolution”

2009

“Daneyal Mahmood Gallery presents Oil Evolutions by Andrei Molodkin - commemorating the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin’s birth. While Molodkin’s work is known for questioning the role of oil in Western democracies; and exploring the troubling intersection between art and money – Oil Evolutions uses oil as a liquid record of the earth’s fossil history to reconstruct the descent of man.

Charles Darwin’s model of evolution comes together in a three-part installation featuring Primate, Australopithecine and Homo sapien skulls negatively cast in acrylic and joined by a series of interconnected tubes circulating crude oil. Here it is not DNA that is the great signifier, that which transmits the virtues of one generation to the next, but oil – the new symbol of a universalized identity.”

From:

http://www.nyartbeat.com/event/2009/367A

“Man may be excused for feeling some pride at having risen, though not through his own exertions, to the very summit of the organic scale; and the fact of his having thus risen, instead of having been aboriginally placed there, may give him hope for a still higher destiny in the distant future. We must, however, acknowledge, as it seems to me, that man with all his noble qualities, with sympathy which feels for the most debased, with benevolence which extends not only to other men but to the humblest living creature, with his god-like intellect which has penetrated into the movements and constitution of the solar system – with all these exalted powers – Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin.” (Charles Darwin)

From:

http://www.artcat.com/exhibits/8970

(via rfmmsd)

— 1 year ago with 102 notes
"When one door closes another door opens, but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us."
Alexander Graham Bell (via quote-book)
— 1 year ago with 2956 notes